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BAKER, KEENER & NAHRA, LLP

Trial Attorneys

Posted by on Mar 11, 2019 in Publications |

Scooters, scooters, scooters everywhere

Scooters, scooters, scooters everywhere

If you’ve driven in Los Angeles or another major U.S. city in the last year you may have noticed a new feature on the sidewalks – electric, motorized scooters everywhere.  Whether they are being ridden, stored in neat rows on the edge of the sidewalk, or tossed carelessly in the middle of walkways, they are quickly becoming a common facet of urban life that communities are finding equal parts nuisance and convenience. California Vehicle Code 21235, the law specifically written to govern motorized scooters, allows for the use of these scooters under certain restrictions such as where they can be driven (generally speaking, not on the sidewalk) or how fast they can be driven (generally speaking, 15 MPH).  Incidentally, as of 2019, if you are over the age of eighteen you may no longer need to wear a helmet (though, of course, it is still strongly recommended you wear one – turning eighteen does not make you impervious to traumatic brain injury).  Take all of this with a grain...

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Posted by on Mar 1, 2019 in Recent Cases |

Jury finds in favor of all defendants in ladder defect case

On January 11, 2019, BKN attorney Ken Spencer obtained a jury verdict in Federal District Court on behalf of our clients, a ladder manufacturer and ladder retailer. In this case, the plaintiff claimed our clients were liable for alleged defects in the manufacture and design of a ladder that was involved in plaintiff’s injuries. However, the jury ultimately disagreed with plaintiff, who had sought $200,000 in damages, and found entirely in favor of our clients for a complete defense...

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Posted by on Feb 14, 2019 in Publications |

Recent legal developments reflect a positive outlook for biometric security

Recent legal developments reflect a positive outlook for biometric security

About four years ago we published a post on some of the legal issues surrounding the use of biometric security. At the time, a Virginia Circuit Court’s nonsensical decision about why a suspect could be forced to unlock a phone with his fingerprint but not give up his password reinforced the fact that the legal system had no idea what to do with biometrics.  Fast forward to today and there are signs that at least some courts are finally coming around to recognize the legal issues implicated by biometric security and address them in a rationale manner. The United States Supreme Court recognized the need for this change of direction in Carpenter v. United States (2018) 138 S. Ct. 2206, where it instructed all courts to adopt rules that “take account of more sophisticated systems that are already in use or in development (Id. at 2218-19) and that courts have an obligation to safeguard constitutional rights and cannot permit those rights to be diminished merely due to the advancement...

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Posted by on Feb 14, 2019 in Recent Cases |

Defense verdict in wrongful death lawsuit

Earlier this month, attorney Robert Baker obtained a complete defense verdict on behalf of our clients in a wrongful death action brought against them by the family of a woman who died after a drug overdose. The jury, rendering its verdict after several days of careful deliberation, agreed that our clients were not responsible for her death and brought to a close a lawsuit that has been hard fought since it was first filed in...

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Posted by on Dec 14, 2018 in Publications |

Closing Thoughts For 2018

Closing Thoughts For 2018

This year has been filled with trials and tragedies reflecting humanity at its worst, just as it has been filled with many moments of self-sacrifice and love reflecting humanity at its best.  Despite the many challenges that our nation and our world have faced this year, and the many they will face in years to come, it’s important to keep things in perspective. For example, a prominent medieval historian recently opined that the 6th century was probably the worst time to be alive – beating out 1918 when the flu killed 50-100 million people and 1349 when the Black Death wiped out half of Europe – when not one, but three massive volcanic eruptions blocked out sunlight for years and the bubonic plague struck the Roman empire, the heart of civilization at the time.  And yet, despite all of the literal darkness, death, and destruction of that century, humanity lived on. It is easy to think that the challenges we face today are insurmountable, but when we look to...

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